In-article:

A Windows 11 bug could damage your data on recent PCs


Noellie Mautaint

August 15, 2022 at 12:00 p.m.

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windows 11

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A year ago, Microsoft was at the heart of a controversy. The company had announced that Windows 11 could only run on TPM 2.0 compatible computers.

The Redmond firm had defended itself by saying that this should make it possible to better secure the data. Today, one of these technologies, which can be found on recent processors, harbors a bug that can damage data on a PC.

A Windows 11 bug that can corrupt your data

Microsoft probably didn’t see it coming. Vector Advanced Encryption Standard (VAES) technology is integrated into recent processors to accelerate and secure encryption or decryption operations. This feature is therefore essential to ensure better security of our privacy. Except that this same technology is the source of a bug that can corrupt data and cause users to lose valuable files.

This thorny problem appeared with one of the most recent versions of Windows 11 and Windows Server 2022. Fortunately, Microsoft has been very responsive and has already rolled out an update that fixes this bug. The update now prevents any data loss due to VAES, but this comes at the cost of performance. The Redmond company was indeed forced to reduce data processing by disabling the instructions related to the bug. It is therefore highly recommended to update Windows 11 urgently, especially if you do not regularly backup your PC to the Cloud or an external hard drive.

Windows 11

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Windows 11

  • Graphical redesign of the successful interface
  • Improved Snap
  • Effective anchor groups

To be completely honest, Windows 11 seems to us to be a good evolution of Windows 10. Beyond the very marketing aspect linked to the surprise effect (Windows 10 was presented as the last of the last, remember) and to the mainly graphical redesign of the interface, the update brings a bit of clarity and modernity that are welcome after six years spent with an OS designed to reconcile Microsoft and its audience. We also like the discreet details that make it more functional, such as the improved snap and anchor groups, or even the refined management of virtual desktops. Finally, we are really convinced by the redesign of the Microsoft Store. By agreeing to return to the exclusivity reserved for UWPs, Microsoft is effectively hitting where it is not expected and finally compels itself to catch up on Apple and Google.

To be completely honest, Windows 11 seems to us to be a good evolution of Windows 10. Beyond the very marketing aspect linked to the surprise effect (Windows 10 was presented as the last of the last, remember) and to the mainly graphical redesign of the interface, the update brings a bit of clarity and modernity that are welcome after six years spent with an OS designed to reconcile Microsoft and its audience. We also like the discreet details that make it more functional, such as the improved snap and anchor groups, or even the refined management of virtual desktops. Finally, we are really convinced by the redesign of the Microsoft Store. By agreeing to return to the exclusivity reserved for UWPs, Microsoft is effectively hitting where it is not expected and finally compels itself to catch up on Apple and Google.

Source : Tom’s Hardware



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