In-article:

After having “disrupted” e-commerce, Amazon is attacking payment at checkout


Nathan Le Gohlisse

Hardware Specialist

August 11, 2022 at 4:45 p.m.

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Amazon One payment © © Amazon

© Amazon

Amazon goes further on the deployment, across the Atlantic, of its Amazon One payment system. Unveiled for the first time two years ago, the latter is content during checkout to scan the palm of your hand to release the payment.

Without hands! Or rather if… but let’s say, without touching anything. This is somewhat the principle behind the Amazon One payment system, introduced for the first time in 2020. As illustrated above, the device allows truly contactless payment, since all you have to do is wave your hand over the above a reader to have your groceries settled. Amazon announced this week to extend this system to 65 additional Whole Foods supermarkets, mainly in California.

A simple start

As specified The Verge, getting the service started is pretty easy. Customers can set up an Amazon One account by registering their palm print using a kiosk at participating stores. Signing up for the service simply requires a payment card and phone number… and of course agreeing to Amazon’s Terms of Service, which includes the use of palm images.

Amazon specifies that these photos are not stored locally within supermarket terminals. They are encrypted and stored on an Amazon server, dedicated to Amazon One.

Supermarket

Amazon wants to “disrupt” checkout payment

Once registration is complete, customers no longer need to pull out their wallet or smartphone to pay at the checkout. All they have to do is intentionally hover their palm over the sensor for the transaction to occur.

As a reminder, Amazon is not at its first attempt to facilitate our shopping… or at least those of its American customers. A few years ago, the firm had, for example, tested a neighborhood grocery store in Seattle without checkouts. A concept subsequently adopted on a larger scale, including in certain Whole Foods stores in the United States.

Source : The Verge



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