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Health: the risk of stroke and sequelae is higher for the poorest people


Europe 1 with AFP

According to a study published on Wednesday by the Ministry of Health, the poorest people, especially aged 45 to 64, are more likely to have strokes and that they are more serious. Complications “strongly correlated with the quality and speed of initial care”.

The frequency and severity of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) are higher among the poorest people, particularly between 45 and 64 years old, according to a study published on Wednesday by the Ministry of Health. A gap of 40%: people belonging to the poorest quarter of French people have a significantly higher risk of suffering a stroke than the richest quarter, underlines the Statistics Department (DREES) from an analysis of data from 2014 to 2017.

The risk of paralysis increased by 22%

This loss of chance varies with age and peaks between 45 and 64 years old, an age group where “the rate of occurrence is almost twice as high”, before “fading at old ages”, no difference being observed from the age of 85. The poorest also suffer more from the after-effects of their strokes: the risk of paralysis persisting beyond 24 hours (often hemiplegia) is increased by 22%, that of language impairment by 11%.

These complications are “strongly correlated with the quality and speed of initial care”. However, the standard of living plays in part on access to the “most appropriate services” in the hospital: the poor have in fact “10% less chance of being taken care of in UNV (neurovascular units )”, adds the Drees.



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