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It applies in Germany – where the mask requirement in the EU has fallen completely

Many EU countries began lifting numerous corona measures at the beginning of April. Vaccination certificates now hardly play a role indoors and when travelling.

It looks a little different with the mask requirement. In Germany, a mask only has to be worn in local and long-distance public transport, as well as on airplanes and in hospitals, doctor’s clinics and in retirement and nursing homes.

From Albania to Cyprus: where does the mask requirement still apply?

Basically, if you fly away on vacation or take the train there, take a mask with you. You should also have your vaccination and recovery certificates with you.

Albania: For a few weeks now, there has only been a recommendation to wear mouth and nose protection. There is no longer an obligation. Vaccination, test and recovery certificates no longer play a role.

Belgium: Persons aged 12 and over must wear a mask on local and long-distance public transport. The same applies to clinics, hospitals, medical practices, nursing homes and senior citizens’ facilities. In the restaurant and in the supermarket there is only one recommendation. Vaccination, convalescence and test evidence are irrelevant.

Bulgaria: The mask requirement no longer applies. Only a recommendation applies. With the abolition of the corona measures, no vaccination or test certificates have to be presented in public life.

Denmark: There is only one recommendation for wearing a mask in healthcare. Anyone who wants to visit patients in the hospital or nursing home must be vaccinated, recovered or tested. But also in the restaurant and in the cinema, individual operators can prescribe a mask or vaccination at the entrance.

Germany: Masks are compulsory in local and long-distance public transport and in the healthcare sector. In addition, a mask is mandatory on aircraft departing from or returning to Germany.

Estonia: Test, recovery and vaccination certificates are unimportant in restaurants, commerce, health care or public life. There has been a recommendation to wear a mask indoors since mid-April.

Finland: Masks are compulsory on public transport.

France: The mask must be worn in health facilities and on public transport. 3G (tested, recovered or vaccinated) also applies in clinics, hospitals, retirement and nursing homes.

Greece: On June 1st, masks will no longer be compulsory in restaurants, shops and cultural venues. In healthcare and nursing homes, the mask must continue to be worn.

Great Britain: Masks are compulsory in health facilities (clinics, hospitals, retirement and nursing homes) and on public transport.

Ireland: Only the recommendation to wear mouth and nose protection in health-related facilities and in public transport applies.

Iceland: No mask requirement, only a recommendation to wear mouth and nose protection for risk groups.

Italy: In hospitals, clinics, medical practices and care facilities, masks are compulsory and 2G (only vaccinated or recovered). Until June 15, travelers must also wear an FFP2 mask in closed spaces (culture, trade, sport, gastronomy) and on public transport.

Croatia: Wherever the minimum distances cannot be maintained, the mask requirement and admission restrictions apply. Restaurants, shops, health and care facilities and cultural institutions are affected.

Latvia: Masks are only compulsory in the healthcare sector and if employers order them accordingly.

Lithuania: Masks are compulsory in health facilities (clinics, hospitals, retirement and nursing homes) and on public transport.

Luxembourg: In the healthcare sector (clinic, hospital, retirement and nursing home), on buses and trains (public transport), the mask requirement continues to apply. Visitors must also be vaccinated, recovered or tested on site (under supervision).

Malta: It is mandatory to wear the mask in health facilities and on public transport. For concerts, cinema or theatre, 3G (tested, recovered or vaccinated) applies to people aged 11 and over.

Moldova: Masks are compulsory in health facilities (clinics, hospitals, retirement and nursing homes) and on public transport. In general, a recommendation to wear a mask in closed rooms still applies.

Monaco: In hospitals, clinics, medical practices and care facilities, masks are compulsory and 3G (only vaccinated, currently tested or recovered).

Netherlands: It is mandatory to wear the mask in health facilities and on public transport. This also applies to airplanes and ships.

North Macedonia: Wearing a mask is mandatory in healthcare facilities and on public transport. For the time being, 3G (tested, recovered or vaccinated) will continue to apply to gastronomy, hotels, retail and hospitals.

Norway: Only recommendation to wear a mask. Clinics and healthcare facilities can make masks compulsory.

Austria: Masks are compulsory in local and long-distance public transport, in taxis and in the healthcare sector.

Poland: Masks are compulsory in hospitals, clinics, medical practices, pharmacies and care facilities.

Portugal: Masks are compulsory in health facilities (pharmacies, clinics, hospitals, retirement and nursing homes) and on public transport. In general, a recommendation to wear a mask in closed rooms still applies.

Romania: In hospitals, clinics, medical practices, pharmacies and care facilities, the mask requirement continues to apply.

Sweden: Masks are no longer compulsory.

Switzerland: Mask requirement abolished.

Serbia: The mask requirement only applies in hospitals, clinics, medical practices, pharmacies and care facilities.

Slovakia: Masks are compulsory in health facilities (clinics, hospitals, retirement and nursing homes).

Slovenia: There is only a recommendation to wear mouth and nose protection.

Spain: Masks are compulsory in public transport, in hospitals, clinics, medical practices, pharmacies, in taxis and in care facilities. Risk patients are also recommended to wear a mask in gastronomy and retail. There is no obligation to do so.

Czech Republic: An FFP2 mask must be worn on buses, trains, planes, in hospitals, clinics, medical practices, pharmacies and care facilities.

Turkey: Masks are compulsory in health facilities (clinics, hospitals, retirement and nursing homes) and on public transport.

Hungary: Masks are compulsory in health facilities (clinics, hospitals, retirement and nursing homes).

Cyprus: For people aged 12 and over, the mask requirement continues to apply in closed rooms. This applies to gastronomy, retail businesses, cultural sites, hotels, hospitals, pharmacies and care facilities. Travelers must be able to show their vaccination and recovery certificates to the authorities at any time.

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