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Thanks to Wordle Archive, you can spend your life guessing ancient words


Do you want to (re)discover the old Wordle? Someone created an Archive version to access old words.

wordle interests the whole world. The Motus 2.0 created by Josh Wardle was even bought by the New York Times, joining the small experiences that the media offers to its readers. The principle is simple: every day, you have six attempts to guess a five-letter word, with no backtracking possible. Except in this version Word Archivespotted by Kotaku on February 4.

As indicated by his name, World Archive allows you to replay old puzzles, even the very first one proposed more than 200 days ago. This is an opportunity to catch up and satisfy a budding passion, in case, like many, you have jumped on the bandwagon (before wordle does not become a phenomenon). Word Archive is available free of charge at this address.

A Wordle layout // Source: Numerama

There is a way to play old Wordle puzzles

Word Archive is one of many projects left over from the creation of Josh Wardle, who never sought to hide anything (originally, he only designed Wordle for one person). Thanks to the unlocked secrets, there is a real emulation that gives rise to simple copies, to bots that spoil the surprise and, also, to interesting variations. Word Archive is one, even though it goes against the principle of wordle — understand: do not become addicted by devoting only a few minutes to the daily puzzle.

Word Archive was imagined by Devand Thakkar, who took over the original format. He simply allowed himself to add a bar of keys which offers the opportunity to go to the first grid, to go back, to choose one, to go to the next one or to pass to the last one. It is even possible to let Word Archive choose for us, at random. In the description, Devand Thakkar does not forget to quote Josh Wardle. This is an open source project, with all of the code available on GitHub.

No one knows, however, what will happen to all these derivatives of wordle once the takeover by the New York Times is finalized.



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