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This Netflix movie is inspired by a masterpiece from 92 years ago!


“In the West, nothing new”, adapted from the work of writer Erich Maria Remarque, has been available on Netflix since the end of October. A remarkable film, to be placed next to the great war film of 1930, crowned by 2 Oscars, to discover absolutely.

Great new adaptation of the work of the writer Erich Maria Remarque, In the West, nothing new, available on Netflix since the end of October, is all the more interesting to discover that it is signed by a German director , Edward Berger.

Like his French counterpart Roland Dorgelès, the illustrious author of Les Croix de bois (remarkably adapted for the cinema by Raymond Bernard in 1931), the German writer Erich Maria Remarque fought in the 1914-18 war.

Marked by the atrocities he witnessed in the trenches, he belongs to this wave of deeply pacifist authors born immediately after the war. In the west, nothing is new is undoubtedly his most famous work. Note was also included by Goebbels on the list of writers banned by the Nazi regime.

92 years after its release, Lewis Milestone’s eponymous and doubly Oscar-winning work has absolutely not aged a bit, wonderfully staged. It caused a sensation in particular because of the violence it showed, unheard of for the time, of the fighting in the trenches, of a rare savagery. In particular a sequence that has remained famous, where the camera, in a tracking shot, films the German machine guns mowing down the French soldiers loading the barbed wire at point-blank range.

Here it is, below…

Behind the mastery of these scenes, the power of the pacifist discourse of the novel by Remarque stands there, intact. And culminates in the splendid final scene, which remains one of the most famous of American cinema, carrying an emotional charge to split the stones in two. Apart from the physical medium, this 1930 version is available on VOD on the Cinetek and Orange sites. If you’ve never seen this nugget, you know what you have to do.



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